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Where Do You Fall Short in Your Creative Business?

June 18, 2019

Where Do You Fall Short in Your Creative Business?

As creative business owners, it can sometimes feel like you’re not doing enough — or doing it well enough. What’s likely happening, though, is that you’re “falling short” in a couple of areas, and that’s spilling over into your other work (which you’re doing exceptionally well). The key is to uncover a place or two where you would say you are “falling short.” Whether you feel short on time, energy, results or follow-through, know this one thing… we all are right there with you! Though uncomfortable, acknowledging the reality of who you are and what you do that might be holding you back can help you really level up — and become the person you really want to become.

How to identify where you “fall short”

When it comes to building a successful business, you need to understand where you fall short so that you can get back on track. Amy Howard shares her tips for evaluating your shortcomings to better sustain your creativity.

 

I like to think of everything in my life as an asset: my time, education, possessions, relationships, current projects, work history, past experiences, past accomplishments, and so on. When you begin to break apart your shortcomings as well as your successes, you see the invaluable outlets as well as those pesky stumbling blocks. Now ask yourself this:


Are you putting too much stock in your weaknesses and not enough in your strengths?


This question can quickly become two-fold. Take Facebook, for instance. This social media outlet is both a distraction and a networking asset. Are you putting too much time into the “entertainment” portion and not enough into the business networking services it provides?


What about your website? Though this will be the first place a potential clients will look for your information, are you struggling to produce the quality web presence your business deserves? Is it time to delegate these crucial duties to someone who can make your site a priority?

And then there is the often overlooked "practice and training" portion of your business. Are you allowing yourself to be taken over by too much paperwork and not enough hands-on training? Continuing to finetune your craft is the only way you will stay above the competition! Allow yourself the time you need to become the sharpest you can at your trade.

“Edit and focus” to resolve your shortcomings

When it comes to building a successful business, you need to understand where you fall short so that you can get back on track. Amy Howard shares her tips for evaluating your shortcomings to better sustain your creativity.

 

The process of examining (and fixing) your shortcomings is what I like to call “Edit and Focus.” Trim the fat, then do what only you can do is how I like to think of it. If you are destined to become who and what you surround yourself with, what are you going to become? What are you guarding and what are you focusing on? Are you allowing nonsense to creep in and steal your precious attention? And most importantly: do you like what you’re seeing, or does something need to change?


Every one of us falls short in an area at one point in every day. Yes, I said day. That is one of the beautiful flaws of humanity. None of us comes ready for “The Big Show,” but rather those who see success have chosen to give themselves over to the discipline that brings about refinement.


Take the time to come back to this place and examine your current status often, dear maker. Where you fall short, begin again. Whenever I see shortcomings rising in my life, I acknowledge two things: gratefulness for everything I have been blessed to experience and the undeniable desire to accomplish so much more. That is your roadmap; the beginning and then the end. Everything in between is found in your willingness to edit, focus, trim, and begin again.

Live in connection with your greater good

When it comes to building a successful business, you need to understand where you fall short so that you can get back on track. Amy Howard shares her tips for evaluating your shortcomings to better sustain your creativity.

 

This is a big deal, dear maker — you’re on this journey to find your dream. I know it, you know it. Just when you start to feel like it might be too much, remember that your purpose isn’t to pursue benign success, but rather live in the conviction that YOU are working towards a greater good. One that fills a need and encourages others just like you.


Until next time,

Amy





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